Mental Health Therapies We Can Offer

At The British CBT & Counselling Service we offer a range of psychological therapies including Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

There are over five hundred different types of psychological therapies or talking therapies currently available and new treatments are continuously developing as a result of innovative psychological research.

A very small number of therapies have actually been proven in scientific studies to be effective but the majority have not. Below is a list of the most notable therapies and the evidence that supports them. You can click on each therapy below to find out more about who the therapy is for and how it works.

We offer Face to Face Counselling, Online/Skype Counselling and Telephone Counselling.

We have clinics in Richmond (Lambert Avenue), Richmond (Lower Mortlake Road), Liverpool Street, Clapham, Marylebone, Fulham, Islington, Twickenham, Chiswick, East Dulwich, Great Missenden and Nottingham. We also offer Online / Skype Counselling.
If you are unsure if therapy is right for you or have any questions then please call us on 0800 002 9068.

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Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT)

DBT combines traditional Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) techniques with a range of other strategies aimed at enabling individuals to manage high levels of emotions (e.g. self-acceptance and nurturing, mindfulness meditation and distress tolerance) and improving interpersonal effectiveness (e.g. communication and assertiveness training).

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Behavioural Therapy

Behavioural Therapy can help to reduce unhelpful or self-destructive behaviours such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Fears, Phobias, Addiction, Anxiety and is also used to help those with chronic pain. Behavioural Therapy is based on the view that all behaviour is learnt and can therefore be unlearnt. It is a relatively practical therapy in which you learn a set of techniques or strategies that when practiced and regularly implemented will enable you to replace your unhelpful behaviours with helpful ones.

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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) looks at how our thoughts influence the way that we feel and what we do. It then helps us to identify thoughts that are inaccurate and/or unhelpful and causing us distress or resulting in problematic behaviours and replace them with thoughts that lead to an improvement in mood and the development of behaviours that get us to where we want to be.

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How to Beat the Winter Blues

How to Beat the Winter Blues It’s that time of year again: the clocks are changing back, the days get shorter and many of us can begin to notice a dip in mood.  Whether you simply suffer from a touch of autumnal apathy or veer towards Seasonal Affective Disorder, it’s good to plan ahead in order to beat the winter blues. What is Seasonal Affective Disorder? Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression that starts during the autumn period, worsens during the winter months, particularly between December and February, and typically improves again in the spring. Symptoms typically can include: A persistent low mood Feeling lethargic or persistent low energy Loss of interest or pleasure in everyday things Sleep difficulties, disturbed sleep, difficulty waking Irritability Depression and/or anxiety, sometimes for no apparent reason Craving carbohydrates and weight gain What causes SAD? The seasonal nature of SAD symptoms are thought to be caused by the changes in exposure to natural sunlight during the winter months, within the higher latitudes of the Northern hemisphere.  Like many other animals in the natural world, our bodies have evolved to rely on exposure to natural light in order to maintain our circadian rhythms, that is to regulate bodily functions such as appetite, digestion, energy levels, sleep and mood.  Whereas for most of our evolutionary history we lived and worked outdoors and our working day was limited by the availability of natural light, in the modern world most people spend the majority of the day working indoors.  Furthermore, the working day has been artificially extended by the invention of the electric light bulb, meaning that we no longer work – and wake – in harmony with our natural biological rhythm. What’s the science behind it? The homeostatic control centre of the brain, the hypothalamus, responsible for regulating our basic physiological processes, is thought to function less effectively in response to reduced exposure to sunlight.  Consequently, the production of certain hormones is affected, specifically: Melatonin: People suffering from SAD produce higher levels of the sleep hormone melatonin during the winter months, accounting for an increase in sleepiness and lack of energy. Serotonin: People suffering from SAD usually produce lower levels of serotonin, which affects mood, appetite and sleep. In addition, there is some evidence that SAD may have a genetic component as some cases appear to run in families. How can psychology help? Whilst there

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Behavioural Therapy

Behavioural Therapy can help to reduce unhelpful or self-destructive behaviours such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Fears, Phobias, Addiction, Anxiety and is also used to help those with chronic pain. Behavioural Therapy is based on the view that all behaviour is learnt and can therefore be unlearnt. It is a relatively practical therapy in which you learn a set of techniques or strategies that when practiced and regularly implemented will enable you to replace your unhelpful behaviours with helpful ones.

More Info

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) looks at how our thoughts influence the way that we feel and what we do. It then helps us to identify thoughts that are inaccurate and/or unhelpful and causing us distress or resulting in problematic behaviours and replace them with thoughts that lead to an improvement in mood and the development of behaviours that get us to where we want to be.

More Info

Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT)

DBT combines traditional Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) techniques with a range of other strategies aimed at enabling individuals to manage high levels of emotions (e.g. self-acceptance and nurturing, mindfulness meditation and distress tolerance) and improving interpersonal effectiveness (e.g. communication and assertiveness training).

More Info