Mental Health Problems We Can Help With

Here you will find a list of common problems that our Psychologists & Psychotherapists can help you with. Don’t worry if your circumstances don’t quite fit an individual category as everyone is different and your symptoms could cover a range of the problems listed below. CBT and talking therapies can help with many different mental health problems so just because a condition isn’t listed here doesn’t mean we can’t help.

We offer Face to Face Counselling, Online/Skype Counselling and Telephone Counselling.

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Behavioural Problems

People of any age can struggle with a behavioural problem, when we talk about behavioural problems in adults we are usually referring to unhealthy behaviours like smoking, alcohol, substance misuse or gambling. This page deals with behavioural problems seen in children and teenagers.

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Low Self Esteem

Low self-esteem is at the root of many of our problems. It can sabotage relationships and careers, cause self- destructive behaviours and hold us back from achieving our full potential. It is a key feature of many mental health problems including depression, anxiety and eating disorders.

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Panic Attacks

A Panic Attack is a distinct episode of anxiety, the onset of which is sudden, and the duration relatively short. During a panic attack symptoms of anxiety are severe, intense and overwhelming, so much so that many people end up in A&E fearing that they are having a heart attack. Repeated Panic Attacks, where an individual’s biggest fear is having another Panic Attack and where this fear is interfering with their ability to do everyday things, is called Panic Disorder.

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Relationship Problems

You may be finding it increasingly difficult to talk to each other, maybe you cannot agree on anything and are constantly bickering and arguing. Maybe you are finding it difficult to trust each other or just feel that there is no longer any warmth or closeness in your relationship. Maybe you have children and are concerned about the impact that your relationship is having on them?

Couples Counselling is for couples wanting to resolve their difficulties, improve their relationship and recapture what existed between them when they first met.

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Physical Pain

The experience of chronic or persistent physical pain is not simply the result of the underlying physiological cause but a combination of the thoughts, feelings and behaviours that accompany it. This explains why it if often not sufficient to treat only the physical aspects of pain (e.g. via analgesics).

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Addiction

An addiction is an uncontrollable urge to engage in a behaviour that is either physically, emotionally, socially and/or financially harmful. Addictions include substance misuse (e.g. alcohol and drugs), gambling, sex, pornography, food, self harm, exercise, shopping, playing videos.

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Anxiety

Anxiety can be a very normal and necessary response to life events, it allows us to be alert to threats, motivates us to act and improves our performance e.g. revising before an exam or preparing before an important meeting. However sometimes anxiety occurs in the absence of an impending event that would generally be considered ‘anxiety provoking’ and starts to interfere with your ability to do the things that you should or would like to be doing.

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Life Changes & General Dissatisfaction

Do you feel dissatisfied with your life? Do you feel like you need to make a change but you aren’t quite sure what that change should be? Do you rarely feel content or at peace? Do you look at other people’s life and think that they are better off than you? Do you feel that you should have achieved more than you have? Did you envisage a different life for yourself than the one you are living?

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Miscarriage

Sadly, for many women miscarriage is a part of having a family. With 1 in 3 pregnancies ending in miscarriage most women who have had 2 or more children will have experienced at least one.

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Overseas Students

Studying overseas can be both exciting and challenging. Faced with meeting new people, adapting to a new culture, improving your language skills and studying whilst being away from home, friends, family and everything that is familiar it is easy to feel overwhelmed.

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Self Harm

Self harm involves a person injuring themselves in some way. Self harm has two forms, the first involves a discrete episode where the individual hurts themselves by cutting, burning, hitting or poisoning. The second type of Self Harm involves ongoing mistreatment that has become part of an almost daily routine for example alcohol abuse or an eating disorder.

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How to Beat the Winter Blues

How to Beat the Winter Blues It’s that time of year again: the clocks are changing back, the days get shorter and many of us can begin to notice a dip in mood.  Whether you simply suffer from a touch of autumnal apathy or veer towards Seasonal Affective Disorder, it’s good to plan ahead in order to beat the winter blues. What is Seasonal Affective Disorder? Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression that starts during the autumn period, worsens during the winter months, particularly between December and February, and typically improves again in the spring. Symptoms typically can include: A persistent low mood Feeling lethargic or persistent low energy Loss of interest or pleasure in everyday things Sleep difficulties, disturbed sleep, difficulty waking Irritability Depression and/or anxiety, sometimes for no apparent reason Craving carbohydrates and weight gain What causes SAD? The seasonal nature of SAD symptoms are thought to be caused by the changes in exposure to natural sunlight during the winter months, within the higher latitudes of the Northern hemisphere.  Like many other animals in the natural world, our bodies have evolved to rely on exposure to natural light in order to maintain our circadian rhythms, that is to regulate bodily functions such as appetite, digestion, energy levels, sleep and mood.  Whereas for most of our evolutionary history we lived and worked outdoors and our working day was limited by the availability of natural light, in the modern world most people spend the majority of the day working indoors.  Furthermore, the working day has been artificially extended by the invention of the electric light bulb, meaning that we no longer work – and wake – in harmony with our natural biological rhythm. What’s the science behind it? The homeostatic control centre of the brain, the hypothalamus, responsible for regulating our basic physiological processes, is thought to function less effectively in response to reduced exposure to sunlight.  Consequently, the production of certain hormones is affected, specifically: Melatonin: People suffering from SAD produce higher levels of the sleep hormone melatonin during the winter months, accounting for an increase in sleepiness and lack of energy. Serotonin: People suffering from SAD usually produce lower levels of serotonin, which affects mood, appetite and sleep. In addition, there is some evidence that SAD may have a genetic component as some cases appear to run in families. How can psychology help? Whilst there

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Addiction

An addiction is an uncontrollable urge to engage in a behaviour that is either physically, emotionally, socially and/or financially harmful. Addictions include substance misuse (e.g. alcohol and drugs), gambling, sex, pornography, food, self harm, exercise, shopping, playing videos.

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Anxiety

Anxiety can be a very normal and necessary response to life events, it allows us to be alert to threats, motivates us to act and improves our performance e.g. revising before an exam or preparing before an important meeting. However sometimes anxiety occurs in the absence of an impending event that would generally be considered ‘anxiety provoking’ and starts to interfere with your ability to do the things that you should or would like to be doing.

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Counselling for Anger in London

Anger is an emotion that we all feel and one that serves a very important protective function, it alerts us to the mistreatment of ourselves and others. In this sense anger is very important for our survival however, anger is a powerful emotion and can sometimes overwhelm us leading us to behave in very (self) destructive ways.

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Depression & Low Mood

By 2020 depression will be the second most disabling condition in the World after heart disease. A significant number of sufferers will go undiagnosed and therefore untreated.

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Jealousy & Insecurity

If we feel insecure we are more likely to feel jealous, whether this is within a relationship or just of what others have that we have not. Either way jealousy can be a very destructive emotion and one that can have an extremely negative impact on us, our lives and those around us.

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Life Changes & General Dissatisfaction

Do you feel dissatisfied with your life? Do you feel like you need to make a change but you aren’t quite sure what that change should be? Do you rarely feel content or at peace? Do you look at other people’s life and think that they are better off than you? Do you feel that you should have achieved more than you have? Did you envisage a different life for yourself than the one you are living?

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Low Self Esteem

Low self-esteem is at the root of many of our problems. It can sabotage relationships and careers, cause self- destructive behaviours and hold us back from achieving our full potential. It is a key feature of many mental health problems including depression, anxiety and eating disorders.

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder with two essential characteristics:

  • Recurrent and persistent thoughts ideas and feelings (referred to as obsessive thoughts)
  • Repetitive, ritualised behaviours (referred to as compulsions or compulsive behaviours)

Attempts to resist a compulsive behaviour produces mounting tension and anxiety, which are relieved immediately by giving in and carrying out the behaviour. The term is not properly used for behaviours like excessive drinking, gambling, eating etc. on the grounds that the ‘compulsive gambler’ for example, actually derives considerable pleasure from gambling (it’s the losing that hurts); one burdened with a true Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) derives no pleasure from it other than the release of tension.

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Paranoia

A Panic Attack is a distinct episode of anxiety, the onset of which is sudden, and the duration relatively short. During a panic attack symptoms of anxiety are severe, intense and overwhelming, so much so that many people end up in A&E fearing that they are having a heart attack. Repeated Panic Attacks, where an individual’s biggest fear is having another Panic Attack and where this fear is interfering with their ability to do everyday things, is called Panic Disorder.

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychological disorder associated with a serious traumatic event e.g. car crash, personal assaults, life threatening experiences. Children may also exhibit physical symptoms including stomach aches and headaches.

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Self Harm

Self harm involves a person injuring themselves in some way. Self harm has two forms, the first involves a discrete episode where the individual hurts themselves by cutting, burning, hitting or poisoning. The second type of Self Harm involves ongoing mistreatment that has become part of an almost daily routine for example alcohol abuse or an eating disorder.

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Stress

Stress is a pressure that we cannot cope with or that is overwhelming us. Stress has an impact on every aspect of our lives; it disrupts our thinking patterns making it harder for us to consider things in a calm, clear and measured way, it effects how we feel leaving us physically tense and emotionally volatile, intolerant and exhausted and it interferes with normal patterns of behaviours including sleeping, eating and sex drive.

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