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False Memory Syndrome

by Dr Emma Gray - 22nd December, 2014
False Memory Syndrome

Repressed Memories To understand what False Memory Syndrome it is important to first understand what a repressed memory is. Repressed memories where first identified by Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis and are believed to be memories that have been blocked out because they are associated with a traumatic event. The theory is a controversial one with some psychologists dismissing the idea due to considerable evidence that the difficulty with traumatic memories for most people is there intrusiveness, for example in the case of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) where sufferers […]...

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Protect Yourself Against Depression – Part 3

In parts one and two of this blog we started to looked at how the meanings that we attached to situations can influence our mood and how specific styles of thinking can make us vulnerable to episodes of depression. In the final part of this blog we will look at 3 further ways of thinking that if avoided or corrected will protect you against depression. 1. Negative Comparison with Others This is the tendency to see yourself as inferior to others, often regardless of the situation. You may tend to […]...

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Protect Yourself Against Depression – Part 2

In the first part of this blog we looked at how it is the way that we think about situations that determines our mood, not the situations themselves. In the second part of this blog we will explore some of the key ways of thinking that lead to depression. 1. Generalisation of Negative Consequences Generalisation is a tendency to assume that the occurrence of single negative outcome is an indication that all future outcomes in similar situation will also be negative, for example being turned down for a job means […]...

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Protect Yourself Against Depression – Part 1

In the first part of this blog we look at how our thoughts are key in protecting ourselves against depression and low mood. It is not what happens to us that makes us depressed, situations in and of themselves do not have the power to influence our mood. It is the way that we think about the things that happen to us that effects how we feel. So in essence, we open the door to negative feelings (including depression, anxiety and anger) with the meaning that we attached to events. […]...

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