Anxiety - Blog Articles

Anxiety

Emetophobia – How Can Therapy Help?

Emetophobia – How can therapy help? In a recent article from BBC News we learnt of a young woman’s fear of vomiting, also known as Emetophobia which affects thousands of people in the UK.  Emetophobes have a fear of vomiting, seeing others being sick, feeling nauseous or seeing vomitus – the phobia is often characterised by avoidance behaviours for example the sufferer may restrict their diet or avoid going out in public. There is limited research on Emetophobia although studies are growing on this particular fear.  Some research suggests a […]...

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Account Of a Panic Attack Victim

Every day since my first panic attack I face the same dread of having the next one. Will it be in public?, will it start to affect my working life?, will it ever stop?, can i really get the energy together to face the day. In addition to this I spend my life over worrying and over thinking about the most insignificant things. I find myself judging everything I do and panicking that it’s not good enough. I have always been a worrier spending weeks worrying about whether I have […]...

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Phobias

by Dr Lisa Debrou - 25th November, 2015
Phobias

Do you have a phobia which is affecting your life and wish it could be different? Whilst some people learn to manage their phobias well, others are severely affected in their quality of life and daily functioning. A phobia is generally characterised by strong and intense levels of anxiety and fear. For some, the anxiety associated with a phobia can serve to maintain patterns of avoidance in life. For example, a person with a phobia of driving might avoid going anywhere that is not accessible by other means (e.g. by […]...

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Techniques To Manage Worry – Part 2

Techniques to manage worry – part 2 How to postpone worries 1. Set a ‘thinking time’
- Nominate a set time, length of time, and place, to do all your thinking about worrisome things. – Try and keep your thinking time the same everyday (e.g., 6pm, 15mins, dining room). Try not to set your thinking time before bed. 2. Postpone • When you notice yourself worrying about something during the day, say something to yourself like 
“it’s OK to have that thought, but I don’t need to chase it any further […]...

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