Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Not Positive Thinking

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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is not as has often been simplistically suggested by the press about positive thinking or about correcting faulty thinking. It is about helping people to evaluate not just how accurate their thinking is, but also how helpful it is, so for example it may be accurate to think that you may die of thirst whilst stranded on a desert island it is not a particularly helpful focus. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is also about then helping people to find more helpful ways of thinking and ultimately behaving so that confidence increasing, self esteem rises, goals are achieved and life is enjoyed.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective for a range of mental health problems including mood related disorders (e.g. depression, low self esteem, low confidence) and anxiety related problems (e.g. anxiety, panic, eating disorders; anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, eating disorders not otherwise specified, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)) and other emotional and behavioural problems (e.g. bereavement, relationship problems, sleep disorders). However, the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) very much depends on the therapist delivering the treatment. If it is applied in a rigid and generic way using protocols and off the shelf treatment plans, it is rarely effective. For Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to be effective the therapist must be able to tailor the therapy programme to meet the individual needs, drawing on the principles of the therapy approach rather than rigidly applying an off the shelf protocol. This takes extensive and rigorous training which all our clinical and counselling psychologist have along with years of experience of tailoring therapy programmes to meet the individual needs of their patients suffering with the full range of mental health, emotional, psychological and behavioural problems.

We currently have clinics offering cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Richmond (Surrey), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Fulham (London), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Clapham (London), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Marylebone (London), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Notting Hill (London), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Chiswick (London), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in West Bridgford (Nottingham), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Stamford (Lincolnshire), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and counselling in Cambridge (Cambridgeshire).

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